International Day of
Sign Languages

International Day of
Sign Languages

The last Sunday in September is dedicated to the approximately 70 million deaf people around the world. It has been declared the International Day of Sign Languages and is being celebrated for the first time this year. SWISS TXT also began producing sign language videos for the deaf in 2018, and is providing live speech-to-text interpreting to support the International Day of Sign Languages event being organised at the UN in Geneva by the SGB-FSS Swiss Association of the Deaf.

Production of sign language videos

As SRG's centre of excellence for access services, SWISS TXT now also produces sign language videos for SRG, as well as for public institutions and businesses. We have the internal infrastructure to produce these videos efficiently, swiftly and cost-effectively. 

Live speech-to-text interpreting at the International Day of Sign Languages in Geneva

As the exclusive producer of subtitles for SRG SSR's television channels, SWISS TXT is sponsoring live speech-to-text interpreting at the International Day of Sign Languages event being organised at the UN in Geneva by the SGB-FFS Swiss Association of the Deaf. 

Live speech-to-text.

International Day of Sign Languages

The day commemorates 23 September 1951, when the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) was founded at its first World Congress in Rome. The WFD has marked this event every year since 1958 with an International Week for the Deaf. This year, the week will culminate on Sunday, 30 September with the International Day of Sign Languages.

Switzerland and the UN Disabilities Convention

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was adopted by the UN General Assembly in New York on 13 December 2006. It entered into force on 3 May 2008 and now has 175 states parties. The CRPD is the first special international convention for the rights of people with disabilities.

The Convention was ratified by Switzerland on 15 April 2014 and entered into force on 15 May 2014. With its accession, Switzerland committed to eliminating the barriers that people with disabilities face, to protecting them against discrimination, and to promoting their inclusion and equal status in society.


Sign language in studio.

sign language

Wikipedia: A sign language is a visual natural language used for communication by the deaf and hard of hearing in particular. Communication is via a combination of gestures, facial expressions, silently mouthed words and physical posture. These elements are combined into sentences and sequences of sentences.

Finger alphabet : a couple of letters.

the Finger alphabet

Wikipedia: The finger alphabet is used to spell words using the fingers. Fingerspelling (also known as dactylology) is used in addition to sign language in communication with the deaf and hard of hearing, in particular to spell out names and words which do not yet have a common sign. Fingerspelling can also be used to emphasise a word when used instead of the corresponding sign.